Using Twitter in Higher Ed Courses

Interested in this topic, but unsure of where to start? Many professors are finding that when students are taught how to use social networking tools to engage in academic thinking, their learning can extend into the day to day moments that are usually lost to waiting in line or drinking coffee.  Easily accessed from any mobile device, students can view a twitter feed from a … Continue reading Using Twitter in Higher Ed Courses

The Art of Conversation

In working with faculty members across several different disciplines to design meaningful courses for college learners, a common thread emerges again and again- we teach more than the content.  When admissions counselors give tours of our institution to prospective students and their parents, the selling points are- relationships with peers and faculty, social events, food and housing, athletics etc.- more than content.  This is the … Continue reading The Art of Conversation

Total Points vs. Weighted Grades

After a lengthy discussion with my husband last night in which he advocated for total points as the ideal higher education grading system while I posited that weighted categories are easier to manage, it became clear that we were both clarifying some misconceptions.  It occurred to me that there are probably many instructors who could use some clarification. I am admittedly biased toward weighted categories, … Continue reading Total Points vs. Weighted Grades

Music in Instruction

Students of all ages are surprised when their instructors introduce a popular song to the learning environment.  Music stimulates areas of the brain that normally snooze along during a standard text or lecture driven lesson.  Any music will work- old, new, traditional etc- but it must be used with purpose.  Here is a recent Prof Hacker post with some inspiring uses for specific popular music, … Continue reading Music in Instruction